Browsed by
Category: GST FAQs

How the Implementation of GST has impacted the ERP – Enterprise Resource Planning Systems

How the Implementation of GST has impacted the ERP – Enterprise Resource Planning Systems

It has been quite a challenge for businesses to switch over to the GST system initially. Those players that had an effective action plan for their ERPs to migrate into the GST regime were the winners of this makeover. Data migration is a daunting task that impacts the master data and the transaction data alike and needs the deployment of adept resources. For this reason, it is essential to evaluate and recognize the areas in the ERP system which could be affected by the GST implementation.

Some of the Key Functionalities that are affected Under the GST System

Here are some of the functionalities that are affected by the implementation of GST.

  • Master Data Details – The GST law puts forward rules regarding the tax charges, location of supply of goods and services, and the time of supply. The tax rates concerning the different goods and services also vary as per these rules. To deal with such scenarios, there arises a need to re-enter the master data which includes the client’s billing and shipping addresses, inventory and warehouse details, item masters, etc. In fact, this has streamlined the different tax procedures as well as the reporting process in the ERP system
  • Chart of Accounts – Previously under the VAT system, the companies that sold goods and offered services at the same time needed to have separate account codes for transactions related to Value Added Tax (VAT) as well as Services Tax. Further, these account codes are combined under the GST system. It was mandatory for the taxpayers to carry forward the tax credit balance from the previous accounting codes to GST account codes in order to maintain the tax credit paid under the earlier system. Later on, the reconciliation of the same was made possible.
  • Reporting and Workflows – Another key change that occurred with the implementation of the GST system was related to the reporting framework and workflows. The already existing reports formatted as per the indirect tax system under the VAT regime have become out-dated and those must be re-designed according to the GST law. The merging of the tax data with the ERP system is susceptible to failure as it acts as a single point for the entire reporting process. Hence there arises the need for the implementation of more robust workflows.
  • Tax Rule Engine – A majority of the ERP systems maintain a separate tax rule engine which serves as the master repository of all the information available inside the system. This consists of details regarding tax jurisdiction, tax compliance, tax rates, and reporting. A lot of re-engineering has gone into developing this tax engine as per the GST system, and it is still undergoing up-gradation on a regular basis.
  •  Requirement of a Smart Reconciliation Tool for the ERP systems – At present, as the amendments are not made in the returns, but would be reflected only in the next month returns, it is essential to have a robust reconciliation tool implanted in the concerned ERP system in order to track changes so as to evade duplication in data. Further, the GST system is all about matching data between numerous returns like GSTR-2A with GSTR-3B returns, GSTR-1 with GSTR-3B returns, etc. To handle this situation, it requires a powerful tool that can offer details about the mismatch in the reports, recommend actions, and circumvent duplicate entries in the books. In fact, matching entries in books and returns is another strenuous task that the businesses have to encounter if the tasks are not automated. A comparison between GSTR-2A return and the purchase register is quite important, as it helps the taxpayer to claim 100% of the ITC (Input Tax Credit) for which he is eligible.
  • Communication Tool for Vendors – The adoption of AI and Machine Learning technologies can be of great help to the larger enterprises in managing the vendor accounts easily. As the GST regime involves uploading the invoice details on to GSTN and matching GST returns between the recipients and suppliers of the supply transactions, it may include regular tracking of vendor ledger accounts using the GSTR-2A return, which is auto-generated on the GST portal. Developing an automated communication tool for vendors which is embedded within the ERP system is the need of the hour that each taxpayer might be looking forward to. This is because it guarantees the timely claiming of ITC and avoids the last minute and later disputes with the vendors regarding any mismatches.
ERP-for-GST-Software

Looking into the Future

Making your organization GST ready could be compared to the implementation or re-implementation/up-gradation of an ERP system from a lower version to a higher one. In fact, it is not that simple as affecting changes in invoice tax calculations; rather, it requires a complete review of the business processes as well as makeovers. Though it sounds complicated, it is not essentially so if the fundamental concepts are understood well.

There are major changes involved in the functioning of the businesses following the GST wave. In fact, with the introduction of GST into the system, there is the same tax structure all over India, unlike it was previously when the businesses had to consider many aspects pertaining to the different states.
 
It is a well-known fact that businesses flourish when there is a well-structured process in place, along with proper reporting and accounting systems. Further, IT plays an important role in running a business successfully. Following the implementation of GST, a revamping of the entire business processes has become mandatory. 

 
Moreover, as the frequent changes in the law are becoming a tough thing for the businesses to handle and interpret, it would be necessary to conduct an impact analysis on their business processes and embed the same in their ERP systems. A major challenge is to make sure that the software is configurable and flexible to deal with such requirements so that the enterprises can implement the changes without any interruptions.

In short, making necessary changes in an ERP environment while syncing with the GST system is an intimidating task which is to be dealt with carefully to run the business smoothly.

What is GSTR 9? Have a Thorough Knowledge about GSTR 9 Online Filing Procedure

What is GSTR 9? Have a Thorough Knowledge about GSTR 9 Online Filing Procedure

These days you might have come across different types of returns which are to be filed under the GST regime. Here, we shall discuss the filing process of the GSTR 9 return in detail. GSTR 9 refers to an annual return which should be filed on a yearly basis by those taxpayers who are registered under the GST system. Further, it includes details related to inward and outward supplies received or made during the preceding year under various heads like SGST, CGST, IGST, and HSN codes. In fact, it is a consolidated statement of the entire monthly/quarterly returns such as GSTR 1, GSTR 2A, GSTR 3B, etc., which are filed during the relevant year. Though this return seems to be a bit complicated, it helps in the reconciliation of data, thereby facilitating complete transparency in the disclosures.

Who All are required to File GSTR 9?

All those taxpayers or taxable individuals who are registered under the GST regime are required to file their GSTR 9 return. Anyhow, the below-mentioned individuals need not file this return:

  • Those taxpayers who opt for composition scheme (they should file GSTR 9A)
  • Input service distributors
  • A casual taxable person
  • Those individuals who pay TDS under section 51 of the CGST Act
  • Non-resident taxable individuals

Important Note: According to the decision made in the 37th GST Council meeting held on 20th September 2019, the GSTR 9 filing for businesses that have a turnover up to Rs.2 crore have been made optional for FY 17-18 and FY 18-19* (*this has been subject to notification).

Due Date, Late Fee, and Penalty for Not Filing GSTR 9 Return

The annual GSTR 9 return form should be provided on or before 31st December in the concerned financial year bracket. In fact, the due date for filing GSTR 9 has been further prolonged to November 30th 2019.
If the GSTR 9 return has not been filed within the due date, the late fee is Rs.100
per day, according to both CGST and SGST Act. In other words, the total liability would be Rs.200 per day of default. Further, this would be subject to a maximum of 0.25% of the turnover of the taxpayer in the concerned state or Union Territory. Anyhow, as per the IGST Act, no late fee is required.

The Important Details Which are Required to be filled in the GSTR 9 Form

The GSTR 9 form has been broadly divided into 6 parts and 19 sections. Every part asks for information which is readily available from the previous returns as well as the books of accounts. Generally, the disclosure of annual sales needs to be done in this form, dividing it between the cases which are subjected to taxation and those which are not subjected to taxation. As concerned with the purchase side, the annual value of inward supplies, as well as the corresponding ITC (Input Tax Credit) availed, should be furnished. Further, these procurements should be categorized as inputs, capital goods, and input services. Moreover, the information concerning ITC that should be reversed owing to ineligibility should also be entered.

GST Software, Eway Bill Solution

The Different Types of Annual GST Returns

There are different types of annual returns which come under GST:

  • GSTR 9 Annual Return Form: A regular taxpayer who files GSTR 1 and GSTR 3B forms need to file the GSTR 9 return
  • GSTR 9A: All the composition scheme holders under GST are required to file the GSTR 9A return
  • GSTR 9B: All e-commerce operators are required to file the GSTR 9B return during a financial year
  • GSTR 9C: Those taxpayers whose annual turnover cross Rs.2 crore need to file the GSTR 9C return during a financial year. Further, these taxpayers need to collect the accounts which are to be audited, along with a copy of the tax reconciliation statement which has been already paid, the audited annual accounts, and the tax payable according to the audited accounts.

To summarize, you would be able to get a gist of the GSTR 9 online filing procedure from the information furnished here.

Explore the Salient Features of GSTR-1

Explore the Salient Features of GSTR-1

GSTR-1 refers to a particular kind of return for outward supplies, which should be filed by each registered dealer on a monthly or quarterly basis. It necessarily indicates the entire sales transactions of a business. This return is segregated into 13 sections which are listed below:

  1. The GSTIN of the business you are engaged in (you can also use a provisional Id as GSTIN, if you do not have one)
  2. The exact legal name of the business
  3.  The aggregate turnover achieved in the last financial year
  4. The taxable supplies/sales offered to registered individuals including UIN-holders
  5. Taxable sales/supplies offered to unregistered individuals who stay outside their base state and that exceeding Rs.2.5 Lakhs (which implies inter-state sales to unregistered individuals, which exceeds Rs.2.5 Lakhs)
  6. Export sales which is deemed and zero-rated
  7. Sales offered to unregistered individuals which is not included in the 5th point
  8. The entire sales which is carried out via an e-commerce operator
  9. The inter-state sales made to unregistered individuals up to an amount of Rs.2.5 Lakhs
  10. Exempted, nil-rated, and non-GST supplies – those which are exempted and not included in the above points
  11. Amendments made in taxable supplies/sales to registered businesses in the preceding months
  12. Amendments made in taxable supplies/sales to unregistered businesses in the past months
  13. Information regarding advances adjusted or received during a month, from the clients
  14. The HSN summary for outward supplies
  15. The documents which are issued during a month, which contain information on the invoice serial numbers, debit notes, and credit notes for the month.
Due Date For GSTR1

What is the Due Date for Filing GSTR-1?

The due date for filing GSTR-1 depends on the turnover of the business. Those businesses which have sales up to Rs.1.5 Crore would have to file quarterly returns whereas, other taxpayers that have sales more than Rs.1.5 Crore would have to file monthly returns which will be 11th of every month.

Who All Are Required to File GSTR-1?

Each registered person is needed to file GSTR-1, regardless of whether there are any transactions carried out during a particular month or not.

The list of registered individuals who are exempted from filing the return are given below:

  • Composition Dealers (The composition scheme is an easy scheme under GST for small-time taxpayers, in which they can avoid complicated GST formalities and remit GST for a fixed turnover rate. This scheme is applicable for those taxpayers that have a turnover less than Rs.1.0 Crore (as per a notification of CBIC, the threshold limit has been increased from Rs.1.0 Crore to Rs.1.5 Crore))
  • Input Service Distributors (An Input Service Distributor or ISD refers to a business for which invoices are issued for the services used by its branches. The tax paid is disbursed to these branches on a proportional basis by means of an ISD invoice. Further, though these branches can have dissimilar GSTINs, they need to have the same PAN as the ISD)
  • Those who are suppliers of Online Information and Database Access or Retrieval (OIDAR) services and have to pay tax by themselves according to Section 14 of the IGST Act
  • The taxpayers who are accountable to collect TCS (The TCS or the Tax Collected at Source refers to the tax owed by a seller which he collects from a buyer during the time of sale. There are certain organizations or people that are classified as sellers for TCS such as the State and Central governments, local authorities, statutory corporation or authority, the companies registered under the Companies Act, the partnership firms, etc. Similarly, there are a few buyers that are liable to pay TCS to the sellers like the Central and State governments, public sector companies, sports and social clubs, etc.
  • The taxpayers who are accountable to deduct TDS (The TDS or Tax Deducted at Source is a method to levy tax based upon a particular percentage on the amount, which should be paid by the receiver on services or goods. The tax which is collected thus would be taken as revenue by the government. The government agencies, local authorities, the departments or establishments belonging to the State or Central government, and some categories of people as per the notification of the government are liable in deducting TDS under the GST Law. Further, according to a recent notification, a board, or an authority, or any other body which is set up by the government, or a State Legislature, or Parliament, of which 51% equity is owned by the government are supposed to deduct TDS. Others who are eligible to deduct TDS include, a society which is registered under the Societies Registration Act, 1860 and has been established by a local authority or any State or Central government, and the public sector undertakings.
  • A non-resident taxable person (As per the GST Law, a non-resident taxable person refers to any individual who performs transactions which include the distribution of services or goods, or both, either as an agent or a principal, or in any other capacity, but do not have a residence or permanent place of business in India).

Is it Possible to Revise GSTR-1?

Once a return is filed, it is unable to revise the same. If there are any mistakes made in the filing of the return, it could be corrected in the next monthly or quarterly return. For example, if there is a mistake made in the September GSTR-1, you are able to rectify it in the October GSTR-1.

Consequences of Late Fee and Penalty

There is a late fee imposed if you do not file GSTR-1 on time, which is Rs.200 for each day of delay (Rs.100 each according to CGST and SGST Act. The late fee is charged from the date succeeding the due date.  As per a recent update, for nil returns, the late fee has been reduced to Rs.50 and Rs.20 for each day.

To sum it up, it is essential to know the basics of the GSTR-1 return before filing the same to avoid any mistakes. This blog gives an outline of what GSTR-1 is all about.

GST law: Who are the persons eligible to opt for composition scheme?

GST law: Who are the persons eligible to opt for composition scheme?

GST Law model

There’s an event management company that organises events in different states. Does it need to register in all states?

The Government through its ‘FAQ tweets’ has clarified that in case of event-related services, a supplier shall be required to obtain the GST registration in the state where the event is held only if such person supplies services from such state. Where the services are provided from a different state, the supplier can charge IGST, treating the location of the event as the ‘Place of Supply’.

Therefore, the need for the event management company to obtain the GST registration in the state where the event is held would need to be determined based on whether they supply any services from such state or not under GST law.

A company has a registered office in Delhi. It needs to purchase goods from one registered manufacturer located in West Bengal and supply them on IGST to their customer in Haryana. To save time and freight charges from West Bengal to Delhi, the company wants to dispatch the goods directly to the location of his customer in Haryana. Please advise on how to issue the invoice keeping in mind that the supplier located in West Bengal will be directly sending the goods to Haryana. Can the company issue the IGST invoice from Delhi to Haryana and send the same to the transporter?

Under the GST law, if a supplier of goods instructs its vendor to supply products directly to a third person, it shall be deemed that the supplier of goods had received them from its vendor at its principal place of business and the tax is to be determined accordingly.

Based on the facts, the principal place of business of the company is Delhi, for which they have obtained the GST registration. Though the vendor would ship the goods directly from its location in West Bengal to the customer’s location in Haryana, it would be deemed that the company has first received the goods in Delhi. Subsequently, the supply of goods by the company shall be treated as supply from Delhi to Haryana, which shall attract integrated tax.

Also read: What is an e-way bill and why is it important?

Who are the persons eligible to opt for composition scheme under the GST law? Also, I want to know if the liability to pay taxes under Reverse Charge Mechanism is covered under the Composition scheme?

The GST law provides an option to a supplier of goods having an annual aggregate turnover not exceeding Rs10 million to opt for payment of GST under composition scheme.

Similar, option has also been provided to a person engaged in the supply of food/beverages (other than alcohol). However, this option is not available for other service providers. This option is also not available if the supplier is engaged in undertaking inter-State supplies.

The GST payable under reverse charge mechanism is not covered under composition scheme. If a person registered under composition scheme procures any goods/services in respect of which the GST is payable under reverse charge mechanism, the person shall be required to pay the GST at applicable rate and not based on rates prescribed under composition scheme.

What would be the GST liability in case of auction of goods? If the bidder is located outside the state of the auction, will IGST be charged or CGST+SGST?

The ‘Place of Supply’ of goods would be the location of goods at the time at which the delivery of goods terminates for supply to the recipient. If the intention of the parties is to transfer the property in goods during the auction or the goods would be sent to the premises of the recipient with the supplier bearing the risk while the goods are in transit. In the former case, CGST and SGST would be levied while in the latter case, IGST would be levied in case inter-state movement is involved.

XaTTaX: Cloud and On-Premises Based GST Filing Software For India

(The author of this article is Amit Bhagat, Tax partner, PwC India. Aditya Khanna, associate director, PwC )
GST FAQ: Answers to all your questions about India’s biggest tax reform

GST FAQ: Answers to all your questions about India’s biggest tax reform

The Central Board of Excise and Customs has made available a new FAQ that answers all your questions about the Goods and Services Tax that will come to effect starting July 1.

GST- FAQs

1) What is Goods & Services Tax (GST)?

It is a destination based tax on consumption of goods and services. It is proposed to be levied at all stages right from manufacture up to final consumption with credit of taxes paid at previous stages available as set off. In a nutshell, only value addition will be taxed and burden of tax is to be borne by the final consumer.

2) What exactly is the concept of destination based tax on consumption?

 The tax would accrue to the taxing authority which has jurisdiction over the place of consumption which is also termed as place of supply.

3) Which of the existing taxes are proposed to be subsumed under GST?

The GST would replace the following taxes:

(i) Taxes currently levied and collected by the Centre:

  • Central Excise duty
  • Duties of Excise (Medicinal and Toilet Preparations)
  • Additional Duties of Excise (Goods of Special Importance)
  • Additional Duties of Excise (Textiles and Textile Products)
  • Additional Duties of Customs (commonly known as CVD)
  • Special Additional Duty of Customs (SAD)
  • Service Tax.

Central Surcharges and Cesses so far as they relate to supply of goods and services

(ii) State taxes that would be subsumed under the GST are:

  • State VAT
  • Central Sales Tax
  • Luxury Taxd. Entry Tax (all forms)
  • Entertainment and Amusement Tax (except when levied by the local bodies)
  • Taxes on advertisements
  • Purchase Tax. Taxes on lotteries, betting and gambling.

State Surcharges and Cesses so far as they are late to supply of goods and services.

The GST Council shall make recommendations to the Union and States on the taxes, cesses and surcharges levied by the Centre, the States and the local bodies which may be subsumed in the GST.

4) What principles were adopted for subsuming the above taxes under GST?

The various Central, State and Local levies were examined to identify their possibility of being subsumed under GST. While identifying, the following principles were kept in mind:

(i) Taxes or levies to be subsumed should be primarily in the nature of indirect taxes, either on the supply of goods or on the supply of services.

(ii) Taxes or levies to be subsumed should be part of the transaction chain which commences with import/manufacture/ production of goods or provision of services at one end and the consumption of goods and services at the other.

(iii) The subsumation should result in free flow of tax credit in intra and inter-State levels. The taxes, levies and fees that are not specifically related to supply of goods and services should not be subsumed under GST.

(v) Revenue fairness for both the Union and the States individually would need to be attempted.

5) Which are the commodities proposed to be kept outside the purview of GST?

Article 366(12A) of the Constitution as amended by 101st Constitutional Amendment Act, 2016 defines the Goods and Services tax (GST) as a tax on supply of goods or services or both, except supply of alcoholic liquor for human consumption. So alcohol for human consumption is kept out of GST by way of definition of GST in constitution. Five petroleum products viz. petroleum crude, motor spirit (petrol), high speed diesel, natural gas and aviation turbine fuel have temporarily been kept out and GST Council shall decide the date from which they shall be included in GST. Furthermore, electricity has been kept out of GST.

6) What will be the status in respect of taxation of above commodities after introduction of GST?

The existing taxation system (VAT and Central Excise) will continue in respect of the above commodities.

7) What will be status of Tobacco and Tobacco products under the GST regime?

Tobacco and tobacco products would be subject to GST. In addition, the Centre would have the power to levy Central Excise duty on these products.

8) What type of GST is proposed to be implemented?

It would be a dual GST with the Centre and States simultaneously levying it on a common tax base. The GST to be levied by the Centre on intra-State supply of goods and / or services would be called the Central GST (CGST) and that to be levied by the States/ Union territory would be called the State GST (SGST)/ UTGST. Similarly, Integrated GST (IGST) will be levied and administered by Centre on every inter-state supply of goods and services.

9) Why is Dual GST required?

India is a federal country where both the Centre and the States have been assigned the powersto levy and collect taxes through appropriate legislation. Both the levels of Government have distinct responsibilities to perform according to the division of powers prescribed in the Constitution for which they need to raise resources. A dual GST will, therefore, be in keeping with the Constitutional requirement of fiscal federalism.

10) Which authority will levy and administer GST?

Centre will levy and administer CGST and IGST while respective states/UTs will levy and administer SGST/UTGST.

11) Why was the Constitution of India amended recently in the context of GST?

Currently, the fiscal powers between the Centre and the States are clearly demarcated in the Constitution with almost no overlap between the respective domains. The Centre has the powers to levy tax on the manufacture of goods (except alcoholic liquor for human consumption, opium, narcotics etc.) while the States have the powers to levy tax on the sale of goods. In the case of inter-State sales, the Centre has the power to levy a tax (the Central Sales Tax) but, the tax is collected and retained entirely by the States. As for services, it is the Centre alone that is empowered to levy service tax.

Introduction of the GST required amendments in the Constitution so as to simultaneously empower the Centre and the States to levy and collect this tax. The Constitution of India has been amended by the Constitution (one hundred and first amendment) Act, 2016 for this purpose. Article 246A of the Constitution empowers the Centre and the States to levy and collect the GST.

12. How a particular transaction of goods and services would be taxed simultaneously under Central GST (CGST) and State GST (SGST)

The Central GST and the State GST would be levied simultaneously on every transaction of supply of goods and services except the exempted goods and services, goods which are outside the purview of GST and the transactions which are below the prescribed threshold limits. Further, both would be levied on the same price or value unlike State VAT which is levied on the value of the goods inclusive of CENVAT. While the location of the supplier and the recipient within the country is immaterial for the purpose of CGST, SGST would be chargeable only when the supplier and the recipient are both located within the State.

Illustration I:

Suppose hypothetically that the rate of CGST is 10 per cent and that of SGST is 10 per cent. When a wholesale dealer of steel in Uttar Pradesh supplies steel bars and rods to a construction company which is also located within the same State for, say Rs 100, the dealer would charge CGST of Rs 10 and SGST of Rs 10 in addition to the basic price of the goods. He would be required to deposit the CGST component into a Central government account while the SGST portion into the account of the concerned State Government.

Of course, he need not actually pay Rs 20 (Rs 10 + Rs 10) in cash as he would be entitled to set off this liability against the CGST or SGST paid on his purchases (say, inputs). But for paying CGST he would be allowed to use only the credit of CGST paid on his purchases while for SGST he can utilize the credit of SGST alone. In other words, CGST credit cannot, in general, be used for payment of SGST. Nor can SGST credit be used for payment of CGST.

Illustration II:

Suppose, again hypothetically, that the rate of CGST is 10 per cent and that of SGST is 10 per cent. When an advertising company located in Mumbai supplies advertising services to a company manufacturing soap also located within the State of Maharashtra for, let us say Rs 100, the ad company would charge CGST of Rs 10 as well as SGST of Rs 10 to the basic value of the service. He would be required to deposit the CGST component into a Central Government account while the SGST portion into the account of the concerned State Government.

Of course, he need not again actually pay Rs 20 (Rs 10 + Rs 10) in cash as it would be entitled to set-off this liability against the CGST or SGST paid on his purchase (say, of inputs such as stationery, office equipment, services of an artist etc.). But for paying CGST he would be allowed to use only the credit of CGST paid on its purchase while for SGST he can utilise the redit of SGST alone. In other words, CGST credit cannot, in general, be used for payment of SGST. Nor can SGST credit be used for payment of CGST.

13) What are the benefits which the Country will accrue from GST?

Introduction of GST would be a very significant step in the field of indirect tax reforms in India. By amalgamating a large number of Central and State taxes into a single tax and allowing set-off of prior-stage taxes, it would mitigate the ill effects of cascading and pave the way for a common national market. For the consumers, the biggest gain would be in terms of a reduction in the overall tax burden on goods, which is currently estimated at 25 per cent – 30 per cent. Introduction of GST would also make our products competitive in the domestic and international markets. Studies show that this would instantly spur economic growth. There may also be revenue gain for the Centre and the States due to widening of the tax base, increase in trade volumes and improved tax compliance. Last but not the least, this tax, because of its transparent character, would be easier to administer.

14) What is IGST?

Under the GST regime, an Integrated GST (IGST) would be levied and collected by the Centre on inter-State supply of goods and services. Under Article 269A of the Constitution, the GST on supplies in the course of inter-state trade or commerce shall be levied and collected by the Government of India and such tax shall be apportioned between the Union and the States in the manner as may be provided by Parliament by law on the recommendations of the Goods and Services Tax Council.

15) Who will decide rates for levy of GST?

The CGST and SGST would be levied at rates to be jointly decided by the Centre and States. The rates would be notified on the recommendations of the GST Council.

16) What would be the role of GST Council?

A GST Council would be constituted comprising the Union Finance Minister (who will be the Chairman of the Council), the Minister of State (Revenue) and the State Finance/Taxation Ministers to make recommendations to the Union and the States on

(i) the taxes, cesses and surcharges levied by the Centre, the States and the local bodies which may be subsumed under GST;

(ii) the goods and services that may be subjected to or exempted from the GST;

(iii) the date on which the GST shall be levied on petroleum crude, high speed diesel, motor spirit (commonly known as petrol), natural gas and aviation turbine fuel;

(iv) model GST laws,principles of levy,apportionment of IGST and the principles that govern the place of supply;

(v) the threshold limit of turnover below which the goods and services may be exempted from GST;

(vi) the rates including floor rates with bands of GST;

(vii)any special rate or rates for a specified period to raise additional resources during any natural calamity or disaster;

(viii) special provision with respect to the North East States, J and K, Himachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand; and

(ix) any other matter relating to the GST, as the Council may decide.

17) What is the guiding principle of GST Council?

The mechanism of GST Council would ensure harmonization on different aspects of GST between the Centre and the States as well as among States. It has been provided in the Constitution (one hundred and first amendment) Act, 2016 that the GST Council, in its discharge of various functions, shall be guided by the need for a harmonized structure of GST and for the development of a harmonized national market for goodsand services.

18) How will decisions be taken by GST Council?

The Constitution (one hundred and first amendment) Act, 2016 provides that every decision of the GST Council shall be taken at a meeting by a majority of not less than 3/4th of the weighted votes of the Members present and voting. The vote of the Central Government shall have a weightage of 1/3rd of the votes cast and the votes of all the State Governments taken together shall have a weightage of 2/3rd of the total votes cast in that meeting. One half of the total number of members of the GST Council shall constitute the quorum at its meetings.

19) Who is liable to pay GST under the proposed GST regime?

Under the GST regime, tax is payable by the taxable person on the supply of goods and/or services. Liability to pay tax arises when the taxable person crosses the turnover threshold of Rs 20 lakhs (Rs 10 lakhs for NE and Special Category States) except in certain specified cases where the taxable person is liable to pay GST even though he has not crossed the threshold limit. The CGST / SGST is payable on all intra-State supply of goods and/or services and IGST is payable on all inter- State supply of goods and/or services. The CGST /SGST and IGST are payable at the ratesspecified in the Schedules to the respective Acts.

20) What are the benefits available to small tax payers under the GST regime?

Tax payers with an aggregate turnover in a financial year u p t o [Rs.20 lakhs & Rs.10 Lakhs for NE and special category states] would be exempt from tax. Further, a person whose aggregate turnover in the preceding financial year is less than Rs.50 Lakhs can opt for a simplified composition scheme where tax will payable at a concessional rate on the turnover in a state. [Aggregate turnover shall include the aggregate value of all taxable supplies, exempt supplies and exports of goods and/or services and exclude taxes viz. GST.] Aggregate turnover shall be computed on all India basis. For NE States and special category states, the exemption threshold shall be [Rs 10 lakhs]. All taxpayers eligible for threshold exemption will have the option of paying tax with input tax credit (ITC) benefits. Tax payers making inter-State supplies or paying tax on reverse charge basis shall not be eligible for threshold exemption.

21) How will the goods and services be classified under GST regime?

HSN (Harmonised System of Nomenclature) code shall be used for classifying the goods under the GST regime. Taxpayers whose turnover is above Rs 1.5 crores but below Rs 5 crores shall use 2-digit code and the taxpayers whose turnover is Rs 5 crores and above shall use 4-digit code. Taxpayers whose turnover is below Rs. 1.5 crores are not required to mention HSN Code in their invoices. Services will be classified as per the Services Accounting Code (SAC).

22) How will imports be taxed under GST?

Imports of Goods and Services will be treated as inter-state supplies and IGST will be levied on import of goods and services into the country. The incidence of tax will follow the destination principle and the tax revenue in case of SGST will accrue to the State where the imported goods and services are consumed. Full and complete set-off will be available on the GST paid on import on goods and services.

23) How will Exports be treated under GST?

Exports will be treated as zero rated supplies. No tax will be payable on exports of goods or services, however credit of input tax credit will be  available and same will be available as refund to the exporters. The Exporter will have an option to either pay tax on the output and claimrefund of IGST or export under Bond without payment of IGST and claim refund of Input Tax Credit (ITC).

24) What is the scope of composition scheme under GST?

Small taxpayers with an aggregate turnover in a preceding financial year up to [Rs 50 lakhs] shall be eligible for composition levy. Under the scheme, a taxpayer shall pay tax as a percentage of his turnover in a state during the year without the benefit of ITC. The rate of tax for CGST and SGST/UTGST shall not be less than [1 per cent for manufacturer & 0.5 per cent in other cases; 2.5 per cent for specific services as mentioned in para 6(b) of Schedule II Viz Serving of food or any other article for human consumption]. A tax payer opting for composition levy shall not collect any tax from his customers. The government may increase the above said limit of 50 lakhs rupees to up to one crore rupees, on the recommendationof GST Council.

Tax payers making inter- state supplies or making supplies through e-commerce operators who are required to collect tax at source shall not be eligible for composition scheme.

25) Will the composition scheme be optional?

Yes.

26) What is GSTN and its role in the GST regime?

GSTN stands for Goods and Service Tax Network (GSTN). A Special Purpose Vehicle called the GSTN has been set up to cater to the needs of GST. The GSTN shall provide a shared IT infrastructure and services to Central and State Governments, tax payers and other stakeholders for implementation of GST. The functions of the GSTN would, inter alia, include:

(i) facilitating registration

(ii) forwarding the returns to Central and State authorities

(iii) computation and settlement of IGST

(iv) matching of tax payment details with banking network

(v) providing various MIS reports to the Central and the State Governments based on the tax payer return information

(vi) providing analysis of tax payers’ profile, and

(vii) running the matching engine for matching, reversal and reclaim of input tax credit.

The GSTN is developing a common GST portal and applications for registration, payment, return and MIS/reports. The GSTN would also be integrating the common GST portal with the existing tax administration IT systems and would be building interfaces for tax payers. Further, the GSTN is developing back-end modules like assessment, audit, refund, appeal etc. for 19 States and UTs (Model II States). The CBEC and Model I States (15 States) are themselves developing their GST back-end systems. Integration of GST front-end system with back-end systems will have to be completed and tested well in advance for making the transition smooth.

27) How are the disputes going to be resolved under the GST regime?

The Constitution (one hundred and first amendment) Act, 2016 provides that the Goods and Services Tax Council shall establish a mechanism to adjudicate any dispute-

  • between the Government of India and one or more States; or
  • between the Government of India and any State or States on one side and one or more other Sates on the other side; or
  • between two or more States, arising out of the recommendations of the Council or implementation thereof.

28) What is the purpose of compliance rating mechanism?

As per Section 149 of the CGST/SGST Act, every registered person shall be assigned a compliance rating based on the record of compliance in respect of specified parameters. Such ratings shall also be placed in the public domain. A prospective client will be able to see the compliance ratings of suppliers and take a decision as to whether to deal with a particular supplier or not. This will create healthy competition amongst taxable persons.

29) Are actionable claims liable to GST?

As per section 2(52) of the CGST/SGST Act actionable claims are to be considered as goods. Schedule III read with Section 7 of the CGST/SGST Act lists the activities or transactions which shall be treated neither as supply of goods nor supply of services. The Schedule lists actionable claims other than lottery, betting and gambling as one of such transactions. Thus only lottery, betting and gambling shall be treated as supplies under the GST regime. All the other actionable claims shall not be supplies.

30) Are transaction in securities be taxable in GST?

Securities have been specifically excluded from the definition of goods as well as services. Thus, the transaction in securities shall not be liable to GST.

31) What is the concept of Information Return?Information return is based on the idea of verifying the compliance levels of registered persons through information procured from independent third party sources. As per section 150 of the CGST/SGST Act, many authorities who are responsible for maintaining records of registration or statement of accounts or any periodic return or document containing details of payment of tax and other details of transaction of goods or services or both ortransactions related to a bank account or consumption of electricity or transaction of purchase, sale or exchange of goods or property or right or interest in a property under any law for the time being in force, are mandated to furnish an information return of the same in respect of such periods, within such time, in such form and manner and to such authority or agency as may be prescribed. Failure to do so may result in penalty being imposed as per Section 123.

32) Different companies have different types of accounting software packages and no specific format are mandated for keeping records. How will department be able to read into these complex software?

As per Section 153 of the CGST/SGST Act, having regard to the nature and complexity of a case and in the interest of revenue, department may take assistance from an expert at any state of scrutiny, inquiry, investigation or any other proceedings.

33) Is there any provision in GST for tax treatment of goods returned by the recipient?

Yes, Section 34 deals with such situations. Where the goods supplied are returned by the recipient, the registered person (supplier of goods) may issue to the recipient a credit note containing the prescribed particulars. The details of the credit note shall be declared by the supplier in the returns for the month during which such credit note was issued but not later than September following the end of the year in which such supply was made or the date of filing of the relevant annual return, whichever is earlier. The details of the credit note shall be matched with the corresponding reduction in claim for input tax credit by the recipient in his valid return for the same tax period or any subsequent tax period and the claim for reduction in output tax liability by the supplier that matches with the corresponding reduction in claim for ITC by the recipient shall be finally accepted and communicated to both parties.

34) What is Anti-Profiteering measure?

As per section 171 of the CGST/SGST Act, any reduction in rate of tax on any supply of goods or services or the benefit of input tax credit shall be passed on to the recipient by way of commensurate reduction in prices. An authority may be constituted by the government to examine whether input tax credits availed by any registered person or the reduction in the tax rate have actually resulted in a commensurate reduction in the price of the goods or services or both supplied by him.

LEVY OF AND EXEMPTION FROM TAX

1) Where is the power to levy GST derived from?

Article 246A of the Constitution, which was introduced by the Constitution (101st Amendment) Act, 2016 confers concurrent powers to both, Parliament and State Legislatures to make laws with respect to GST i.e. Central tax (CGST) and state tax (SGST) or union territory tax (UTGST). However, clause 2 of Article 246A read with Article 269A provides exclusive power to the Parliament to legislate with respect to inter-State trade or commerce i.e. Integrated tax (IGST).

2) What is the taxable event under GST?

Taxable event under GST is supply of goods or services or both. CGST and SGST/ UTGST will be levied on intra-State supplies. IGST will be levied on inter-State supplies.

3) Whether supplies made without consideration will also come within the purview of supply under GST?

Yes, but only those activities which are specified in Schedule I to the CGST Act / SGST Act. The said provision has been adopted in IGST Act as well as in UTGST Act also.

4) Will giving away essential commodities by a charitable institution be taxable activity?

In order to be a supply which is taxable under GST, the transaction should be in the course or furtherance of business. As there is no quid pro quo involved in supply for charitable activities, it is not a supply under GST.

5) Who can notify a transaction to be supply of goods or services?

Central Government or State Government, on the recommendations of the GST Council, can notify an activity to be the supply of goods and not supply of services or supply of services and not supply of goods or neither a supply of goods nor a supply of services.

6) What are composite supply and mixed supply? How are these two different from each other?

Composite supply is a supply consisting of two or more taxable supplies of goods or services or both or any combination thereof, which are bundled in natural course and are supplied in conjunction with each other in the ordinary course of business and where one of which is a principal supply. For example, when a consumer buys a television set and he also gets warranty and a maintenance contract with the TV, this supply is a composite supply. In this example, supply of TV is the principal supply, warranty and maintenance service are ancillary.

Mixed supply is combination of more than one individual supplies of goods or services or any combination thereof made in conjunction with each other for a single price, which can ordinarily be supplied separately. For example, a shopkeeper selling storage water bottles along with refrigerator. Bottles and the refrigerator can easily be priced and sold separately.

7) What is the treatment of composite supply and mixed supply under GST?

Composite supply shall be treated as supply of the principal supply. Mixed supply would be treated as supply of that particular goods or services which attracts the highest rate of tax.

8) Are all goods and services taxable under GST?

Supplies of all goods and services are taxable except alcoholic liquor for human consumption. Supply of petroleum crude, high speed diesel, motor spirit (commonly nown as petrol), natural gas and aviation turbine fuel shall be taxable with effect from a future date. This date would be notified by the Government on the recommendations of the GST Council.

9) What is meant by Reverse Charge?

It means the liability to pay tax is on the recipient of supply of goods and services instead of the supplier of such goods or services in respect of notified categories of supply.

10) Is the reverse charge mechanism applicable only to services?

No, reverse charge applies to supplies of both goods and services, as notified by the Government on the recommendations of the GST Council.

11) What will be the implications in case of receipt of supply from unregistered persons?

In case of receipt of supply from an unregistered person, the registered person who is receiving goods or services shall be liable to pay tax under reverse charge mechanism.

12) Can any person other than the supplier or recipient be liable to pay tax under GST?

Yes, the Central/State government can specify categories of services the tax on which shall be paid by the electronic commerce operator, if such services are supplied through it and all the provisions of the Act shall apply to such electronic commerce operator as if he is the person liable to pay tax in relation to supply of such services.

13) What is the threshold for opting to pay tax under the composition scheme?

The threshold for composition scheme is Rs 50 lakh of aggregate turnover in the preceding financial year. The benefit of composition scheme can be availed up to the turnover of Rs 50 lakh in current financial year.

14) What are the rates of tax for composition scheme?

There are different rates for different sectors. In normal cases of supplier of goods (i.e. traders), the composition rate is 0.5 % of the turnover in a State or Union territory. If the person opting for composition scheme is manufacturer, then the rate is 1 per cent of the turnover in a State or Union territory. In case of restaurant services, it is 2.5 per cent of the turnover in a State or Union territory. These rates are under one Act, and samerate would be applicable in the other Act also. So, effectively, the composition rates (combined rate under CGST and SGST/UTGST) are 1 per cent, 2 per cent and 5 per cent for normal supplier, manufacturer and restaurant service respectively.

15) A person availing composition scheme during a financial year crosses the turnover of Rs 50 lakh during the course of the year i.e. say he crosses the turnover of Rs 50 lakh in December? Will he be allowed to pay tax under composition scheme for the remainder of the year i.e. till 31st March?

No. The option availed shall lapse from the day on which his aggregate turnover during the financial yearexceeds Rs 50 lakh.

16) Will a taxable person, having multiple registrations, be eligible to opt for composition scheme only for a few of registrations?All registered persons having the same Permanent Account Number (PAN) have to opt for composition scheme. If one registered person opts for normal scheme, others become ineligible for composition scheme.

17) Can composition scheme be availed of by a manufacturer and a service supplier?

Yes, a manufacturer can opt for composition scheme generally. However, a manufacturer of goods, which would be notified on the recommendations of the GST Council, cannot opt for this scheme. This scheme is not available for services sector, except restaurants.

Courtesy: Central Board of Excise and Customs.

10 Key Questions on Demand and Recovery under GST

10 Key Questions on Demand and Recovery under GST

Under Goods and Services Tax Law, specific provisions have been laid down to levy penalty and interest in case of short-payment/ delayed payment/ non-payment of GST be it bonafide or in case of fraud/ suppression/ mis-statement etc.

We take up 10 key questions pertaining to demand and recovery under GST:

Q1. What if person chargeable with tax, pays the amount along with interest before issue of show cause notice under section 73?
Ans. Section 73 deals with the cases where there is no invocation of fraud/suppression/mis-statement etc. Section 74 deals with cases where the provisions related to fraud/suppression/mis-statement etc. are invoked.

In such cases notice shall not be issued by the proper officer.

Q2. If show cause notice is issued under Section 73 and thereafter the noticee makes payment along with applicable interest, is there any need to adjudicate the case?
Ans. If the person pays the tax along with interest within 30 days of issue of notice, no penalty shall be payable and all proceedings in respect of such notice shall be deemed to be concluded.

Q3. What is the relevant date for issue of Show Cause Notice?
Ans. In case of section 73(cases other than fraud/ suppression of facts/willful misstatement), the relevant date shall be counted from the due date for filing of annual return for the financial year to which demand relates to.

The SCN has to be adjudicated within at period of three years from the due date of filing of annual return. The SCN is required to be issued at least three months prior to the time limit set for adjudication.

In case of section 74(cases involving fraud/ suppression of facts/willful misstatement), the relevant date shall be counted from the due date for filing of annual return for the financial year to which demand relates to. The SCN has to be adjudicated within at period of five years from the due date of filing of annual return. The SCN is required to be issued at least six months prior to the time limit set for adjudication.

Q4. Is there any time limit for adjudication the cases?
Ans. In case of section 73(cases other than fraud/ suppression of facts/willful misstatement), the time limit for adjudication of cases is 3 years from the due date for filing of annual return for the financial year to which demand relates to.

In case of section 74(cases of fraud/suppression of facts/willful misstatement), the time limit for adjudication is 5 years from the due date for filing of annual return for the financial year to which demand relates to.

Q5. Is there any immunity to a person chargeable with tax in cases of fraud/suppression of facts/willful misstatement, who pays the amount of demand along-with interest before issue of notice?
Ans. Yes. Person chargeable with tax, shall have an option to pay the amount of tax along with interest and penalty equal to 15% percent of the tax involved, as ascertained either on his own or ascertained by the proper officer, and on such payment, no notice shall be issued with respect to the tax so paid.

Q6. If notice is issued under Section 74 and thereafter the noticee makes payment, is there any need to adjudicate the case?
Ans. Where the person to whom a notice has been issued under sub-section (1) of section 74, pays the tax along with interest with penalty equal to 25% of such tax within 30 days of issue of notice, all proceedings in respect of such notice shall be deemed to be concluded.

Q7. In case a notice is adjudicated under Section 74 and order issued confirming tax demand and penalty, does the noticee have any option to pay reduced penalty?
Ans. Yes. if any person pays the tax determined by the order along with interest and a penalty equivalent to 50% of such tax within thirty days of the communication of order, all proceedings in respect of the said tax shall be deemed to be concluded.

Q8. What happens if a person collects tax from another person but does not deposit the same with Government?
Ans. It is mandatory to pay amount, collected from other person representing tax under this act, to the government. For any such amount not so paid, proper officer may issue SCN for recovery of such amount and penalty equivalent to such amount.

Q9. What are the modes of recovery of tax available to the proper officer?
Ans. The proper officer may recover the dues in following manner:
a) Deduction of dues from the amount owned by the tax authorities payable to such person.
b) Recovery by way of detaining and selling any goods belonging to such person;
c) Recovery from other person, from whom money is due or may become due to such person or who holds or may subsequently hold money for or on account of such person, to pay to the credit of the Central or a State Government;
d) Distrain any movable or immovable property belonging to such person, until the amount payable is paid. If the dues not paid within 30days, the said property is to be sold and with the proceeds of such sale the amount payable and cost of sale shall be recovered.
e) Through the Collector of the district in which such person owns any property or resides or carries on his business, as if it was an arrear of land revenue.
(f) By way of an application to the appropriate Magistrate who in turn shall proceed to recover the amount as if it were a fine imposed by him.
(g) Through enforcing the bond /instrument executed under this Act or any rules or regulations made thereunder.
(h) CGST arrears can be recovered as an arrear of SGST and vice-versa.

Q10. Whether the payment of tax dues can be made in installments?
Ans. On receipt of any such request, Commissioner/Chief Commissioner may extend the time for payment or allow payment of any amount due under the Act, other than the amount due as per the liability self-assessed in any return, by such person in monthly installments not exceeding twenty four, subject to payment of interest under section 50 with such limitations and conditions as may be prescribed. However, where there is default in payment of any one installment on its due date, the whole outstanding balance payable on such date shall become payable and recovered without any further notice.

source- FAQ by CBEC
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on Goods and Services Tax (GST)

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on Goods and Services Tax (GST)

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on Goods and Services Tax (GST)

The Goods and Services Tax (GST) has been passed by Rajya Sabha and Lok Sabha. The new tax bill will bring enhanced efficiency and transparency. Moreover, the whole country will have a uniform tax structure, which will benefit not only manufacturers but also consumers. In this series of article, we present to you frequently asked questions about the Goods and Services Tax.

What is GST?

GST is the only one indirect tax for the whole nation, which will make India one unified common market. GST is a single tax on the supply of goods and services, right from the manufacturer to the consumer. According to government sources, the new GST bill will bring transparency.

GST India

How does GST work?

In GST, credits of input taxes paid at each stage will be available in the subsequent stage of value addition. This makes GST essentially a tax only on value addition at each stage. The final consumer will have to bear only the GST charged by the last dealer in the supply chain, with set off benefits at all the previous stages.

What are the benefits of GST?

The GST will bring in several benefits for business and industry, Central and State Governments and the consumer. If you are part of business and industry, the GST will offer easy compliance via online. This means all tax payer services such as registrations, returns, and payments would be available to the taxpayers online.

The GST will ensure that indirect tax rates and structures are common across the country. This simplifies the ease of doing business in India. The GST will provide seamless tax credits throughout the value chain, and across the state boundaries. The new tax system will improve competition and provides advantages to manufacturers and exporters.

As far as central and state governments are concerned, the GST will be easy to administer than the current complex tax. They can control leakages and prevent tax evasion. It will also bring higher revenue efficiency by decreasing the total cost of collection of tax revenues of the government.

On the consumer front, the new Goods and Services Tax (GST) enable consumers to pay only one tax based on the total value of goods and services. The new tax system will enhance efficiency and prevents leakages. Moreover, the overall tax burden on several products will decrease, which will ultimately benefit consumers.

Which taxes at the Center and State level are being subsumed into GST?

The Central Excise Duty, Additional Excise Duty, Service Tax, Countervailing Duty, Special Additional Duty of Customs are merged into one at the central government level. As far as state government is concerned, the State Value Added Tax/Sales Tax, Entertainment Tax, Octroi, Entry tax, Purchase Tax, Luxury tax and taxes on lottery, betting and gambling are combined into one single tax. For online purchases, IGST will be created.

What are the major chronological events that have led to the introduction of GST?

GST is being introduced in the country after a 13 year long journey since it was first discussed in the report of the Kelkar Task Force on indirect taxes. It was a tough challenge for the government to pass the GST bill. It was P. Chidambaram who proposed the idea of levying GST. However, the opposition parties at that time were opposed to it. Moreover, in coalition politics, things are not smooth. The GST got huge attention in 2014 after the NDA government assumed office.

  • Kelkar Task Force – 2013
  • Budget Speech for the financial year 2006 – 2007 (implementation by April 1, 2010)
  • Design and Road Map for the implementation of GST was assigned to the Empowered Committee (EC)of State Finance Ministers
  • First Discussion Paper on Goods and Services Tax in India released in November, 2009
  • Joint Working Group was constituted in September 2009
  • Constitution (115th Amendment) Bill was introduced in the Lok Sabha in March 2011, referred to standing committee on Finance
  • Committee on GST Design formed
  • Report submitted by GST Design in in January 2013
  • Three committees formed in Bhubaneswar meeting
  • Parliamentary Standing Committee submitted its Report in August 2013 to the Lok Sabha
  • Final draft Constitutional Amendment Bill sent to the Empowered Committee for consideration in September 2013.
  • More recommendations in Shillong in November 2013
  • 115th Constitutional (Amendment) Bill 2011 lapsed following the dissolution of the 15th Lok Sabha
  • Draft Constitution Amendment Bill was sent to the Empowered Committee in June 2014
  • Introduced in the Lok Sabha on December 19, 2014
  • Passed by the Lok Sabha on May 6, 2015
  • Kerala Finance Minister KM. Mani resigned as GST Council chairman on November 2015
  • Referred to the Select Committee of Rajya Sabha, which submitted its report on 22.07.2015

How would GST be administered in India?

Basically, there are two components of GST such as the Central GST (CGST) and State GST (SGST). Both central government and the respective state governments will levy GST across the value chain at the same time. You should note that the tax will be levied on each and every supply of goods and services.

While the centre would levy and collect Central Goods and Services Tax (CGST), the state governments would also levy and collect the State Goods and Services Tax (SGST) on all transactions within a State.

Moreover, the input tax credit of CGST would be available for discharging the CGST liability on the output at each stage. In the same way, the SGST credit paid on inputs would be allowed for paying the SGST on output. In the Goods and Services Tax, no cross utilization of credit would be permitted.

How would a particular transaction of goods and services be taxed simultaneously under CGST and SGST?

The Central GST and the State GST would be levied simultaneously on every transaction of supply of goods and services except on exempted goods and services. You will not be charged any GST if the relevant goods are outside the purview of GST and the transaction which are below the prescribed threshold limits.

Furthermore, both would be levied on the same value unlike State VAT which is levied on the value of the goods inclusive of Central Excise. The central government has created a diagrammatic representation of the working of the Dual GST model within a State.

Dual GST within State

Will cross utilization of credits between goods and services be allowed under GST regime?

The Goods and Services Tax will allow cross utilization of CGST and SGST credit between goods and services. However, this will not be allowed in the case of interstate supply of goods and services under the IGST model.

How will Information Technology be used for the implementation of GST?

The central and state government have jointly registered Goods and Services Tax Network (GSTN) as a non-profit government company, which will provide shared IT infrastructure and service to both central and state governments including tax payers and other stakeholders.

The main objective of GSTN is to provide a standard and uniform interface to the taxpayers in addition to shared infrastructure and services to Central and State/UT governments.

In the meantime, the GSTN is currently working on the development of a state of the art comprehensive IT infrastructure. This includes the common GST portal, which provides the following functions.

  • Frontend services of registration
  • Returns and payments to all taxpayers
  • Processing of returns, registrations, audits, assessments and appeals

Meanwhile, all states, accounting bodies, RBI and banks are also working to prepare IT infrastructure for the administration of GST.

You need not have to manually file returns. You will be provided with a detailed portal for the payment of taxes online and other GST Compliance Software help you for your GST retuns . You need not have to worry about mismatched returns since it would be auto generated without any manual intervention.

How will be interstate Transactions of Goods and Services be taxed under GST in terms of IGST method?

In case of interstate transactions, the Centre would charge and collect the Integrated Goods and Services Tax (IGST) on all interstate supplies of goods and services under Article 269A(1) of the Constitution. The IGST would roughly be equal to CGST plus SGST. This tax is applicable to online purchases made through Flipkart, Amazon, Snapdeal and others.

The IGST has been designed and structured in such a way to ensure seamless flow of input tax credit from one State to another. The interstate seller would pay IGST on the sale of his goods to the Central Government after adjusting credit of IGST, CGST and SGST on the purchases.

The exporting state will transfer to the Centre the credit of SGST used in payment of IGST. The importing dealer will claim credit of IGST while discharging his output tax liability (both CGST and SGST) in his own State.

The Centre will transfer to the importing State the credit of IGST used in payment of SGST. Since GST is a destination based tax, all SGST on the final product will ordinarily accrue to the consuming State.

How will imports be taxed under GST?

In case of imports from foreign countries, the Additional Duty of Excise or CVD and the Special Additional Duty or SAD presently being levied will be integrated into the GST. As per Article 269A (1), IGST will be applicable on all imports into the Indian territory. The stated where imported goods are consumed will now gain their share from this IGST paid on imported goods.

× How can I help you?